Top Menu FAQ Membershipts etc

Search the catalog above.

HPL Kids

The Kidzone has programs galore as well as books, movies, and other cool stuff. Read our blog below for more information and check out our upcoming events to get an idea of what's happening at the Kidzone! Our main phone number is 205.444.7830.

Recent Book Reviews

Horten's Incredible Illusions: Magic, Mystery & Another Very Strange Adventure
Lula Bell on Geekdom, Freakdom & the Challenges of Bad Hair
A Mutiny in Time
Starry River of the Sky
Pickle: The (Formerly) Anonymous Prank Club of Fountain Point Middle School
Iron Hearted Violet
Jake and Lily
Paris Pan Takes the Dare
Me and the Pumpkin Queen
Read All About It!
The Boy on Cinnamon Street
Nerd Camp
The Classroom
Smells Like Dog
Mission Unstoppable
On the Road to Mr. Mineo's
The Mark of Athena
A Whole Lot of Lucky
Alien on a Rampage
One for the Murphys

More of our favorite books on GoodReads »

Kidzone Blog

Join us for a day in a galaxy far, far away at our Star Wars Movie Marathon! Whether you've seen them a million times or want your family to see them for the first time, come view these iconic films on the big screen in the Library Theatre! We will be showing the original trilogy on Saturday, May the 4th, 2019 -- Episode IV: A New Hope, Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back, and Episode VI: Return of the Jedi.  Admission and refreshments are free.

  • Episode IV at 10:15 a.m.
  • Episode V at 1 p.m.
  • Episode VI at 3:15 p.m.

We'll also have coloring sheets, Origami Yoda folding, and a scavenger hunt set up all day long in the Kid Zone.  Drop by anytime.  And May the Fourth be with you.  Always.

The internationally recognized date for Holocaust Remembrance Day corresponds to the 27th day of Nisan on the Hebrew calendar. It marks the anniversary of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising. In Hebrew, Holocaust Remembrance Day is called Yom Hashoah. When the actual date of Yom Hashoah falls on a Friday, the state of Israel observes Yom Hashoah on the preceding Thursday. When it falls on a Sunday, Yom Hashoah is observed on the following Monday.   This year’s Yom HaShoah starts at sundown on Wednesday, May 1, lasting until nightfall the next day on Thursday, May 2.

Here are some newer Holocaust titles available at Hoover Public Library.

Anne Frank by Stephen Krensky (DK Life Stories)
JB  FRA
Anne Frank's diary is read by children and adults worldwide. It tells two stories: one of an extraordinary young girl living in hiding during one of the most fearsome times in history, and one of a relatable young girl facing the same questions and troubles that kids come up against today. Learn how both sides of this puzzle made up the person who is Anne Frank. In this biography for kids ages 8-12, meet Anne's family and friends, explore "The Annex" where they hid, and see her story put in historical context alongside information about World War II and the Holocaust, and Hitler and Nazi Germany.

The Red Ribbon by Lucy Adlington
YA  ADL
Three weeks after being detained on her way home from school, fourteen-year-old Ella finds herself in the Upper Tailoring Studio, a sewing workshop inside a Nazi concentration camp. There, two dozen skeletal women toil over stolen sewing machines. They are the seamstresses of Birchwood, stitching couture dresses for a perilous client list: wives of the camp’s Nazi overseers and the female SS officers who make prisoners’ lives miserable. It is a workshop where stylish designs or careless stitches can mean life or death. And it is where Ella meets Rose. As thoughtful and resilient as the dressmakers themselves, Rose and Ella’s story is one of courage, desperation, and hope — hope as delicate and as strong as silk, as vibrant as a red ribbon in a sea of gray.

Resistance by Jennifer A. Nielsen
J  NIE
Chaya Lindner is a teenager living in Nazi-occupied Poland. Simply being Jewish places her in danger of being killed or sent to the camps. After her little sister is taken away, her younger brother disappears, and her parents all but give up hope, Chaya is determined to make a difference. Using forged papers and her fair features, Chaya becomes a courier and travels between the Jewish ghettos of Poland, smuggling food, papers, and even people.  Soon Chaya joins a resistance cell that runs raids on the Nazis' supplies. But after a mission goes terribly wrong, Chaya's network shatters. She is alone and unsure of where to go, until Esther, a member of her cell, finds her and delivers a message that chills Chaya to her core, and sends her on a journey toward an even larger uprising in the works -- in the Warsaw Ghetto.  Though the Jewish resistance never had much of a chance against the Nazis, they were determined to save as many lives as possible, and to live -- or die -- with honor.

What Was the Holocaust? by Gail Herman
J  940.53  HER
The Holocaust was a genocide on a scale never before seen, with as many as twelve million people killed in Nazi death camps—six million of them Jews. Gail Herman traces the rise of Hitler and the Nazis, whose rabid anti-Semitism led first to humiliating anti-Jewish laws, then to ghettos all over Eastern Europe, and ultimately to the Final Solution. She presents just enough information for an elementary-school audience in a readable, well-researched book that covers one of the most horrible times in history.
 

I read a wide variety of picture books, and I read a lot of them.  A LOT.  And, sometimes, I notice a delightfully unexpected trend.  Like this one.  Each of these new titles features an abstract concept as a physical entity.  I read Me and My Fear first.  While I was raving about it to Justin, he told me about another title.  While I was reading that, a book I had on hold came in . . . and the trend was set.  All three of these books are great ways to talk to your kids about difficult concepts.  They would work especially well in the classroom.

Me and My Fear by Francesca Sanna (September 11, 2018)
E  SAN  NEW BOOK
When a young immigrant girl has to travel to a new country and start at a new school, she is accompanied by her Fear who tells her to be alone and afraid, growing bigger and bigger every day with questions like "how can you hope to make new friends if you don't understand their language?" But this little girl is stronger than her Fear. This heartwarming and timely tale shows us the importance of sharing your Fear with others--after all, everyone carries a Fear with them, even if it's small enough to fit into their pocket!

The Silence Slips In by Alison Hughes (March 5, 2019)
E  HUG  NEW BOOK
When the party's over and the baby finally falls asleep, when the dog is all barked out and the screens are dark, the Silence pads in on soft, furry feet. A warm, comforting presence, the Silence curls up in a sun-beam like a cuddly cat and helps you read, think and be still. The Silence is friends with the Dark. Together they soothe the jagged edges left when the Noise has rolled on and gently launch the boats of your dreams into the night. When the day becomes overwhelming or other feelings become too big, the Silence slips in.

When Sadness Is at Your Door by Eva Eland (January 29, 2019)
E  ELA  NEW BOOK
Sadness can be scary and confusing at any age! When we feel sad, especially for long periods of time, it can seem as if the sadness is a part of who we are--an overwhelming, invisible, and scary sensation.  Eland brilliantly approaches this feeling as if it is a visitor. She gives it a shape and a face, and encourages the reader to give it a name, all of which helps to demystify it and distinguish it from ourselves. She suggests activities to do with it, like sitting quietly, drawing, and going outside for a walk. The beauty of this approach is in the respect the book has for the feeling, and the absence of a narrative that encourages the reader to "get over" it or indicates that it's "bad," both of which are anxiety-producing notions.  Simple illustrations  invite readers to add their own impressions.

El día de los niños/El día de los libros (Children's Day/Book Day), commonly known as Día, is a celebration every day of children, families, and reading that culminates yearly on April 30.  Día is a nationally recognized initiative that emphasizes the importance of literacy for all children from all backgrounds. It is a daily commitment to linking children and their families to diverse books, languages and cultures.  Every year, the Association for Library Service to Children (ALSC) curates a list of diverse STEAM titles to help readers celebrate Día.  Click on the blue age range to see a printable list.  Click on individual titles to find the books in the Hoover Public Library.

2019 marks the 100th anniversary of Children's Book Week, the nation's longest running national literacy program!  This milestone celebration's theme is Read Now, Read Forever.  So, look to the past, present, and most important, the future of children's books this April 29-May 5

Get the inside scoop on some of the best new books when you watch Creator Corner on KidLit TV.
Get book recs from this year's CBW Spokesperson, Ayesha Curry.
Print out an official bookmark and activity sheet from today's top illustrators.
Print out the poster designed by multi award-winning artist Yuyi Morales.
Read one of these new books celebrating books!  You can find them at Hoover Public Library!

The Book Hog by Greg Pizzoli
Just Read! by Lori Degman
The Lost Book by Margarita Surnaite
The Night Library by David Zeltser
Shhh! I'm Reading! by John Kelly

Pages