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Illegal Graphic Novel

Illegal by Eoin Colfer & Andrew Donkin, illustrated by Giovanni Rigano (August 7, 2018)
Readers follow the flight of Ebo, a Ghanaian refugee child, to Europe to find the siblings who fled before him. Ebo’s journey takes him across the scorching heat of the Sahara and through the streets of Tripoli, where he works to raise funds for passage across the Mediterranean. All the while, Ebo and the companions he meets along the way must elude the watchful eyes of the authorities who are constantly on alert for refugees. But after Ebo finally saves enough money and secures a seat on a boat crossing to Greece, he finds himself on the brink of death. Like all the others, it is too crowded; the engine is broken; and the fuel is slowly running out. Authors and illustrator take readers back and forth through time, building suspense as Ebo’s story of survival unfolds. The format allows sensitive and difficult topics such as murder, death, and horrific, traumatizing conditions to unfold for children, Ebo’s reactions speaking volumes and dramatic perspectives giving a sense of scope. A creators’ note provides factual context, and an appendix offers an Eritrean refugee’s minimemoir in graphic form.  Action-filled and engaging but considerate of both topic and audience, Ebo’s story effectively paints a picture of a child refugee’s struggle in a world crisscrossed by hostile borders. (from Kirkus Reviews)

Watch the book trailer.  Read the Spotlight article from Publishers Weekly.

Target Age: 
Katiem's picture
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Katiem

Catwoman: Soulstealer

Bestselling author Sarah J. Maas has penned the newest release in the DC Icons series!

Soulstealer (August 7, 2018)
When the Bat's away, the Cat will play. It's time to see how many lives this cat really has.
Two years after escaping Gotham City's slums, Selina Kyle returns as the mysterious and wealthy Holly Vanderhees. She quickly discovers that with Batman off on a vital mission, Gotham City looks ripe for the taking.  Meanwhile, Luke Fox wants to prove that as Batwing he has what it takes to help people. He targets a new thief on the prowl who has teamed up with Poison Ivy and Harley Quinn. Together, they are wreaking havoc. This Catwoman is clever--she may be Batwing's undoing.  Selina is playing a desperate game of cat and mouse, forming unexpected friendships and entangling herself with Batwing by night and her devilishly handsome neighbor Luke Fox by day. But with a dangerous threat from the past on her tail, will she be able to pull off the heist that's closest to her heart?

Target Age: 
Katiem's picture
Author: 
Katiem

Talking with Tae Keller

The Science of Breakable Things is the debut middle-grade novel for Tae Keller.  And it is one of my favorite books that I read this summer.  

"Natalie Napoli’s seventh-grade science class is working on a yearlong experiment, recording their findings in “Wonderings journals.” The text of Natalie’s journal comprises Keller’s moving debut novel. Natalie used to like science and spent much of her childhood in her botanist mother’s laboratory. But her mother, suffering from severe depression, has barely left her bedroom in months. Natalie and her best friend Twig collaborate with new student Dari to win an egg drop contest for their experiment, and Natalie imagines using the prize money to fly with her mother to New Mexico, home to a striking cobalt blue orchid, born out of a toxic chemical spill, that her mother had been studying. Natalie’s Korean heritage is sensitively explored, as is the central issue of depression and its impact; Keller draws thoughtful parallels between Natalie’s mother’s struggles and the fragility of orchids and eggs. Natalie’s fraught relationship with her mother, and her friendships with Twig and Dari, are the heart of the book, but science is its soul." [from Publishers Weekly]

BONUS!
Author Jennifer Barnes interviewed Keller for Booklist, which gave The Science of Breakable Things a starred review -- calling it "a movable story about fragility and rebirth."  Take a look!

The title says it all.  Cartoon Network's Teen Titans GO! is now a feature film.  And critics are calling it Deadpool for kids . . . but better.  

"When the Teen Titans go to the big screen, they go big! Teen Titans GO! to the Movies finds our egocentric, wildly satirical Super Heroes in their first feature film extravaganza - a fresh, gleefully clever, kid-appropriately crass and tongue-in-cheek play on the superhero genre, complete with musical numbers. It seems to the Teens that all the major superheroes out there are starring in their own movies everyone but the Teen Titans, that is! But de facto leader Robin is determined to remedy the situation, and be seen as a star instead of a sidekick. If only they could get the hottest Hollywood film director to notice them. With a few madcap ideas and a song in their heart, the Teen Titans head to Tinsel Town, certain to pull off their dream. But when the group is radically misdirected by a seriously super villain and his maniacal plan to take over the Earth, things really go awry. The team finds their friendship and their fighting spirit failing, putting the very fate of the Teen Titans themselves on the line!" [from Rotten Tomatoes]

Watch the trailer here.

The Hub is a teen collections blog for YALSA, the Young Adult Library Services Association.  Their blog post on November 28, 2017 featured books set in the halls of middle school.  I've read most of them, so I can vouch for their awesomeness.  Find them on the shelves at Hoover Public Library.

Alan Cole Is Not a Coward by Eric Bell
All's Faire in Middle School by Victoria Jamieson
Armstrong & Charlie by Steven B. Frank
Brave by Svetlana Chmakova
The First Rule of Punk by Celia C. Pérez
Halfway Normal by Barbara Dee
Patina by Jason Reynolds
Posted by John David Anderson
The Stars Beneath Our Feet by David Barclay Moore
Things That Surprise You by Jennifer Maschari
The Way to Bea by Kat Yeh
Well, That Was Awkward by Rachel Vail

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Volunteer applications are taken year round, but opportunities are available on a limited basis. During the school year times are available for special programs only. Applications will be held on file until opportunities arise. Volunteers are needed more during the summer to help with the library’s Summer Reading Program.